COVID-19 Updates

Click here for the Latest News Releases

To keep the public informed, the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders are providing regular updates in government services and pertinent links regarding COVID-19. Coronavirus is a serious illness that spreads from person to person. Cape May County officials are working closely with the State and Federal Government to provide the latest information to help mitigate the spread of this virus.

Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton and Freeholder Jeffrey L. Pierson, who oversees the Cape May County Department of Health want to assure everyone that the County is closely monitoring the spread of COVID-19 in Cape May County and throughout the region. Their foremost goal is to protect the well-being of our employees and families as well as our residents and visitors and continue to provide essential services to our County.

County government will continue to operate, and all government functions will be offered with some adjustments including limited hours of operation and reduced services. Communications remain open and the public is encouraged to call or email for needed services or information.

We are all working together to keep you informed and safe.

Gerald M. Thornton, Freeholder Director
Jeffrey L. Pierson, Freeholder, liaison, Health and Human Services.


Governor Philip D. Murphy 

Executive Orders Regarding COVID-19

Administrative Orders Regarding COVID-19


The Board of Chosen Freeholders have passed resolutions regarding COVID-19, click here to view the resolutions.



COVID-19 Updates 8/6/20

New Jersey has 183,701 total COVID-19 positive cases and 13,996 deaths. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 1001 including 82 deaths. Additionally, there is 1 new out of county positive cases that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.


8.6.20 covid graphs 

Cape May County Announces Opening of Drive-thru COVID-19 Testing by Appointment Only

Cape May Court House- Freeholder Jeff Pierson announces that the Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network (CCHN) are partnering to open drive-thru COVID-19 testing clinics. The drive-throughs will be held on August 13th and 20th by appointment only at the Cape May County Fire Academy, 171 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 starting at 8am. 

 Persons requesting COVID-19 testing will need an appointment with a CCHN provider

  • Persons requesting a COVID-19 test will be screened by the CCHN provider
  • Persons requesting COVID-19 tests can be tested whether they have COVID-19 symptoms or COVID-19 exposure and No-symptoms. Many people have had some type of exposure and although they have no symptoms, wish to be tested and that is acceptable.

Appointments for screenings can be requested by visiting CompleteCareNJ.org and clicking the Request an Appointment tab or calling 609-465-0258. To help save time, using the website is recommended.

Once your appointment request is received, you will receive a call back from a CompleteCare representative to help you schedule your visit. If testing is required, your prescription will be sent to the Health Department who will then call you to schedule your drive-thru testing time.

The full process for scheduling an appointment for COVID-19 drive-thru testing and more information about the virus can be found at CompleteCareNJ.org/COVID19.

CompleteCare accepts Medicaid, Medicare as well as private insurance plans and those without insurance. The test will be free of charge and no co-pay will be required for the screening. Your insurance company will be billed for the test and screening. For those who do not have insurance, the cost will be covered by the federal government. Translation services are available for those in need.

Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network will work to ensure people are informed of their results in a timely manner. This is a nasal saline test and results are usually available within 3-4 days, however recently some delays have been experienced due to a surge in testing.

There is currently no vaccine or treatment for COVID-19. The best thing to do is protect yourself by wearing a mask, social distancing and washing your hands often. If you are sick, please help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to friends and family by doing the following:

  • Stay home except to get medical care. Most individuals with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. It is important that you do not leave your home, except to get medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Call 9-1-1 or visit the emergency department if you are having trouble breathing or other serious symptoms.
  • Monitor your symptoms. Common symptoms include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention but call first.
  • Do not visit public places and avoid public transportation.
  • Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as “home isolation”. You want to stay away from others as much as possible. Create a “sick room” if possible.
  • Call your doctor ahead before visiting. Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes. 
  • Clean your hands often. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items. 
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day. 


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Updates 8/5/20

New Jersey has 183,327 total COVID-19 positive cases and 13,989 deaths. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 999 including 82 deaths. Additionally, there is 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

8.5.20 covid graphs

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 8/4/20

New Jersey has 182,970 total COVID-19 positive cases and 13,982 deaths. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 994 including 82 deaths. Additionally, there is 1 out of county positive case. 

8.4.20 covid graphs

Contact Tracing 

Contact tracing, a core disease control measure employed by local and state health department personnel for decades, is a key strategy for preventing further spread of COVID-19. Contact tracing is part of the process of supporting patients with suspected or confirmed infection.

In contact tracing, public health staff work with a patient to help them recall everyone with whom they have had close contact during the timeframe while they may have been infectious. Currently, the Health Department has 5 tracers from Rutgers and 15 tracers in-house for a total of 19. If you receive a call from a Health Department contact tracer the purpose is to warn the exposed individuals (contacts) of their potential exposure as rapidly and sensitively as possible. In order to stop the spread of the disease it is important to answer all contact tracer questions accurately and completely.

Contacts are provided with education, information, and support to understand their risk, what they should do to separate themselves from others who are not exposed, monitor themselves for illness, and the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they themselves do not feel ill. Being the contact of someone who had close contact with a COVID-19-postive person does not require testing.

For example, if you have a coworker whose family member is a confirmed case, you are not necessarily at risk. Despite coming into contact with the coworker, you did not have close contact with the person who actually has COVID-19.

Contacts are encouraged to stay home and maintain social distance from others (at least 6 feet) until 14 days after their last exposure, in case they also become ill. They should monitor themselves by checking their temperature twice daily and watching for cough or shortness of breath. To the extent possible, public health staff should check in with contacts to make sure they are self-monitoring and have not developed symptoms. Contacts who develop symptoms should promptly isolate themselves and notify public health staff. They should be promptly evaluated for infection and for the need for medical care.

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea


Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit https://capemaycountynj.gov/ or Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 8/3/20

New Jersey has 182,614 total COVID-19 positive cases and 13,971 deaths. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 991 including 82 deaths. Additionally, there are 2 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

8.3.20 covid graphs


COVID-19 Update 8/2/20

Cape May Court House- New Jersey has 182,350 total COVID-19 positive cases and 13,961 deaths. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 988 including 82 deaths. Additionally, there are 4 new out of county positive cases that are included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

8.2.20 covid graphs

 

Cape May County Announces Opening of Drive-thru COVID-19 Testing by Appointment Only

Cape May Court House- Freeholder Jeff Pierson announces that the Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network (CCHN) are partnering to open drive-thru COVID-19 testing clinics. The drive-throughs will be held on August 6th, 13th and 20th by appointment only at the Cape May County Fire Academy, 171 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 starting at 8am. 

 Persons requesting COVID-19 testing will need an appointment with a CCHN provider

  • Persons requesting a COVID-19 test will be screened by the CCHN provider
  • Persons requesting COVID-19 tests can be tested whether they have COVID-19 symptoms or COVID-19 exposure and No-symptoms. Many people have had some type of exposure and although they have no symptoms, wish to be tested and that is acceptable.

Appointments for screenings can be requested by visiting CompleteCareNJ.org and clicking the Request an Appointment tab or calling 609-465-0258. To help save time, using the website is recommended.

Once your appointment request is received, you will receive a call back from a CompleteCare representative to help you schedule your visit. If testing is required, your prescription will be sent to the Health Department who will then call you to schedule your drive-thru testing time.

The full process for scheduling an appointment for COVID-19 drive-thru testing and more information about the virus can be found at CompleteCareNJ.org/COVID19.

CompleteCare accepts Medicaid, Medicare as well as private insurance plans and those without insurance. The test will be free of charge and no co-pay will be required for the screening. Your insurance company will be billed for the test and screening. For those who do not have insurance, the cost will be covered by the federal government. Translation services are available for those in need.

Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network will work to ensure people are informed of their results in a timely manner. This is a nasal saline test and results are usually available within 3-4 days, however recently some delays have been experienced due to a surge in testing.

There is currently no vaccine or treatment for COVID-19. The best thing to do is protect yourself by wearing a mask, social distancing and washing your hands often. If you are sick, please help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to friends and family by doing the following:

  • Stay home except to get medical care. Most individuals with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. It is important that you do not leave your home, except to get medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Call 9-1-1 or visit the emergency department if you are having trouble breathing or other serious symptoms.
  • Monitor your symptoms. Common symptoms include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention but call first.
  • Do not visit public places and avoid public transportation.
  • Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as “home isolation”. You want to stay away from others as much as possible. Create a “sick room” if possible.
  • Call your doctor ahead before visiting. Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes. 
  • Clean your hands often. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items. 
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day. 


Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


COVID-19 Update 8/1/20

Cape May Court House- New Jersey has 182,029 total COVID-19 positive cases and 13,955 deaths. Total positive cases of COVID-19 infection in Cape May County is now 983 including 82 deaths. Additionally, there is 1 new out of county positive case that is included in the Non-resident Active Cases listed below.

7.31.20 covid graphs

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolve. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.

Cape May County Announces Opening of Drive-thru COVID-19 Testing by Appointment Only

Cape May Court House- Freeholder Jeff Pierson announces that the Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network (CCHN) are partnering to open drive-thru COVID-19 testing clinics. The first drive-thru will be held on Thursday July 30th by appointment only at the Cape May County Fire Academy, 171 Crest Haven Rd, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210 starting at 8am. Other testing dates will be scheduled based on community need.

  • Persons requesting COVID-19 testing will need an appointment with a CCHN provider
  • Persons requesting a COVID-19 test will be screened by the CCHN provider
  • Persons requesting COVID-19 tests can be tested whether they have COVID-19 symptoms or COVID-19 exposure and No-symptoms. Many people have had some type of exposure and although they have no symptoms, wish to be tested and that is acceptable.

Appointments for screenings can be requested by visiting CompleteCareNJ.org and clicking the Request an Appointment tab or calling 609-465-0258. To help save time, using the website is recommended.  

Once your appointment request is received, you will receive a call back from a CompleteCare representative to help you schedule your visit. If testing is required, your prescription will be sent to the Health Department who will then call you to schedule your drive-thru testing time.  

The full process for scheduling an appointment for COVID-19 drive-thru testing and more information about the virus can be found at CompleteCareNJ.org/COVID19.

CompleteCare accepts Medicaid, Medicare as well as private insurance plans and those without insurance. The test will be free of charge and no co-pay will be required for the screening. Your insurance company will be billed for the test and screening. For those who do not have insurance, the cost will be covered by the federal government. Translation services are available for those in need.

Cape May County Department of Health and CompleteCare Health Network will work to ensure people are informed of their results in a timely manner. This is a nasal saline test and results are usually available within 3-4 days, however recently some delays have been experienced due to a surge in testing.

There is currently no vaccine or treatment for COVID-19. The best thing to do is protect yourself by wearing a mask, social distancing and washing your hands often. If you are sick, please help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to friends and family by doing the following:

  • Stay home except to get medical care. Most individuals with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. It is important that you do not leave your home, except to get medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Call 9-1-1 or visit the emergency department if you are having trouble breathing or other serious symptoms.
  • Monitor your symptoms. Common symptoms include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention but call first.
  • Do not visit public places and avoid public transportation.
  • Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as “home isolation”. You want to stay away from others as much as possible. Create a “sick room” if possible.
  • Call your doctor ahead before visiting. Many medical visits for routine care are being postponed or done by phone or telemedicine.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes. 
  • Clean your hands often. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items. 
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day. 

Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System Hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, World Health Organization at www.who.int, New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net and also like us on Facebook.


Cape May County Zoo Takes Additional Safety Precautions

The Cape May County Zoo is taking additional steps to provide safety precautions for its visitors, staff, and animals. Capacity is going to be placed at 20% and all visitors over the age of 2-years-old are required to wear a mask, to follow the Centers for Disease Control guidelines. These changes will go into effect beginning on Friday, July 3.

The new protocols will allow visitors who are in the Zoo a safer experience, while further promoting social distancing. The Cape May County Health Department has partnered with the Cape May County Zoo and had the Social Distancing Ambassadors make appearances at the Zoo to promote proper safety protocols and they will continue to make appearances there throughout the summer.

“As we have learned during this time period you can never be too careful,” said Freeholder E. Marie Hayes, liaison to the Cape May County Zoo. “As Cape May County reopens ‘Safely Together,’ we need to constantly look at our protocols and procedures and make changes that are deemed necessary.”

This decision follows a request from the Cape May County Freeholder Board, all Cape May County Mayors, and the Cape May County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors to request mask usage in public places. This request was made to both keep residents and visitors safe, and to ensure the economy can stay open.

“New Jersey’s overall case numbers have been on a downward trend,” said Freeholder Director Gerald M. Thornton. “We want to keep it that way and I applaud the Zoo staff for the hard work they have put in to ensure that our visitors remain safe, while visiting one of the best attractions in the United States.”

A one-way directional flow had already been set up throughout the Zoo to reduce the amount of interactions between guests where possible. Also, the Aviary and Reptile House continue to remain closed at this time.


County Freeholders, Mayors, and Chamber Issue Urgent Request for Universal Mask-Wearing

CAPE MAY COUNTY, NJ – The Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Cape May County Chamber Board of Directors, and the Mayors of all sixteen Cape May County municipalities released this joint statement today as follows:

We join together to urgently request that all residents of and visitors to Cape May County wear face coverings in all public places, other than certain very limited exceptions. Thanks to the good sense, hard work, and sacrifices of members of our community, COVID-19 cases in Cape May County have remained below a critical threshold, however, we must take bold steps to ensure that cases continue to trend downward or, at minimum, remain steady even with the influx of seasonal residents and visitors expected during July and August. For the health of all and as an investment in the economic health of our community, we deeply appreciate and now depend upon the cooperation of business owners, staff members, and the public in this needed next step.

States and regions ahead of New Jersey in the business reopening process are experiencing surges of the coronavirus that are, in certain instances, exceeding the capacity of medical infrastructure. This has caused both pauses in business openings and the reclosing of businesses.  As a result, community leaders are focusing attention on and stepping up efforts to promote protocols such as mask-wearing in order to avoid similar outcomes.

“Cape May County is a safe place to live, work, and visit, and we must step up aggressively to meet the COVID threat in order to keep it that way,” stated Will Morey, Cape May County Freeholder and Co-Chair of the County’s Recovery Task Force. “We’re in a position right now to contain the mild outbreak of COVID that our County is experiencing. Engaging this clear and present threat will serve to protect public health and, for businesses, may literally save the summer,” Morey added.

An established and growing body of scientific studies support mask-wearing as an effective mitigation in the spread of COVID-19, and a consensus had rapidly developed on this matter in the wider medical community. States that have instituted a mask mandate have demonstrably slowed their COVID growth rate.

For specifics on face coverings that are in compliance with this request, please see the relevant CDC guidance.

The following are exceptions, where the mask-wearing request does not apply:

  • For those engaged in active outdoor recreation such as swimming, walking, hiking, bicycling, or running.
  • While on the beach, so long as strict social distancing is maintained.
  • When socially distanced and eating or drinking in public at a restaurant, bar, or other food or beverage establishment.
  • By those who cannot medically tolerate wearing a face covering.
  • By children aged 9 or younger.

Please note that the request for the wearing of face coverings INCLUDES the County’s Boardwalks.

“Wherever you are, we welcome you to come here and enjoy your summer in a responsible way,” said Freeholder Len Desiderio, who is the Mayor of Sea Isle City and Co-Chair of the County’s Recovery Task Force. “We’ve had good participation with directives so far, and this urgent mask-wearing request is an important way for us to be proactive and make sure our visitors will not make COVID a summer memory,” he added.

While united in issuing this urgent request for the wearing of face coverings, the group also recognizes the absolute necessity of observing adherence to capacity limitations imposed by State Executive Order, particularly for bars and restaurants.  All efforts will be made to encourage and compel owners, staff, and the public to operate and congregate within those limits.

“Businesses are really the front line of actively encouraging folks to follow protocols, wear masks and social distance,” commented Vicki Clark, President of the Cape May County Chamber. “This urgent request will help businesses protect their employees and customers, as well as their own economic vitality throughout the summer season,” added Clark.

The County will continue to monitor health data and observations of activity in the area and update the public on mitigation measures as needed. To assist with positively and proactively requesting mask use, free graphics and marketing materials are available for public download at www.safelytogethercmc.com.


DRIVER’S LICENSES

All driver licenses, non-driver IDs, vehicle registrations, inspection stickers, and temporary tags expiring before May 31 have been extended to July 31. Documents expiring in June or July are extended by two months.

In addition, the federal REAL ID requirement has been extended for another year, until October 2021.

Most renewals of driver licenses, non-driver IDs, and registrations -- including some commercial registrations -- can be processed online at NJMVC.gov. Customers can change their address, pay fees, and access other services online as well.

NEW SAFETY PROTOCOLS FOR MVC OPERATIONS

Going forward, everyone who enters the MVC agency will be required to wear a face covering. That includes customers as well as employees. If a customer cannot wear a face covering, MVC will make other arrangements for their transaction.

In order to limit crowds and speed services during the phased reopening, some agencies have been designated as Licensing Centers and some as Vehicle Centers. Lists of Licensing Centers and Vehicle Centers, as well as information on transactions, will be posted soon at NJMVC.gov.

Drop-off and pick-up transactions will be processed starting June 15, but only the following:

  • At designated Licensing Centers, MVC will be processing and validating permits from driving schools and high schools on a drop-off basis.
  • At designated Vehicle Centers, MVC will be processing registration and title work from dealers. License plates can also be surrendered by drop-off at these agencies in a designated area.


Summer Programs

Beginning July 6, youth day camps, including municipal summer programs, will be able to operate so long as they comply with required social distancing and other mitigation policies. Residential and overnight camps are prohibited from operating.

To help protect the health and safety of our children, camp workers, and communities against the spread of COVID-19, the Department of Health has released the following guidelines for youth summer camps:

  • Campers and staff must be screened for fever or signs of COVID-19 illness prior to being permitted to enter the facility or participating in camp programming. Persons that have a fever or other signs of illness should not be admitted to the camp.
  • Campers and staff members should be educated on steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • Groups should include the same children each day with the same staff person, if possible. Mixing between groups should be restricted. Camps should avoid communal dining and stagger mealtimes to ensure social distancing of groups. Surfaces should be cleaned and sanitized between each meal service.
  • Staff are encouraged to wear cloth masks while working unless (1) doing so would inhibit the individual’s health, (2) the individual is in extreme heat outdoors, or (3) the individual is in water.
  • Cloth face coverings for staff and campers should be worn when social distancing of 6 feet between assigned groups cannot be maintained. Cloth face coverings should NOT be put on children under age two because of the danger of suffocation.
  • All youth camps are prohibited from off-site activities, engaging in full-contact sports and providing resident or overnight camp activities.
  • Hand wash and hand sanitizers stations should be provided in numerous areas around the camp.
  • Common surfaces and rooms should be cleaned at least daily including restrooms and countertops.
  • Gloves should be worn when handling or serving food to campers.
  • Social distancing is encouraged during bussing/transportation to and from camp. Vehicles should be cleaned and disinfected between each use. Face coverings should be worn when social distancing can’t be maintained.


On Monday, June 22, personal care services will resume in New Jersey, including:

  • Beauty salons;
  • Barber shops;
  • Cosmetology shops
  • Spas, including day spas and medical spas – but not saunas, steam rooms, or shared bathing facilities;
  • Electrology facilities;
  • Hair braiding shops;
  • Massage parlors;
  • Nail salons;
  • Tanning salons; and
  • Tattoo parlors.

Businesses licensed by the New Jersey State Board of Cosmetology and Hairstyling and the New Jersey Board of Massage and Bodywork Therapy must follow the comprehensive health and safety standards issued by the Division of Consumer Affairs, including:

  • Limiting services to appointment-only;
  • Performing prescreening and temperature checks of clients and staff prior to entering the facility;
  • Ensuring staff-client pairs remain at least six feet apart unless separated by physical barriers;
  • Requiring use of personal protective equipment, and requiring clients to wear face coverings at all times, regardless of the service they are receiving, unless face down on a massage table or where doing so would inhibit an individual’s health;
  • Adopting enhanced cleaning and disinfection practices; and
  • Staying informed about new developments and guidance related to COVID-19.

Tattoo parlors and tanning salons must follow health and safety standards issued by the Department of Health, including:

  • Requiring appointments;
  • Performing prescreening and temperature checks of clients and staff prior to entering the facility
  • Recommending clients wait in cars or away from facility if the waiting area cannot accommodate social distancing;
  • Requiring face coverings; and
  • Adopting appropriate infection control, disinfection, and sanitization practices.

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit https://capemaycountynj.gov/ or Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.


If you are Immunocompromised, Protect yourself from COVID-19

Many conditions and treatments can weaken a person’s immune system (making them “immunocompromised”). Some of these include:

  • Cancer
  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Solid organ transplant
  • Stem cells for cancer treatment
  • Genetic immune deficiencies
  • HIV
  • Use of oral or intravenous corticosteroids or other medicines called immunosuppressants that lower the body’s ability to fight some infections (e.g., mycophenolate, sirolimus, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, etanercept, rituximab)

Risk of Severe Illness from COVID- 19

People with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of getting severely sick from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. They may also remain infectious for a longer period of time than others with COVID-19, but we cannot confirm this until we learn more about this new virus.

Prevent COVID-19

If you are immunocompromised, the best way to prevent COVID-19 is to avoid being exposed to this virus. For details, see CDC’s advice for what you can do to prepare for COVID-19 and how to protect yourself and others.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. 
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid leaving home as much as possible and practice social distancing. 
    • If you must leave home, avoid other people as much as possible by practicing social distancing. Maintain a distance of at least 6 feet (2 meters) between you and people outside your household.
    • Avoid large gatherings or places where people congregate.
    • Have supplies, food, and medicine delivered to your home.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face covering when around others to protect other people in case you are infected, and ask others to do the same. 
    • Remember, do NOT place cloth face coverings on children younger than 2 years old, anyone who has trouble breathing, or anyone who is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the cover without assistance.
  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

Steps You Can Take to Protect Your Health

  • Continue your regular treatment plan. Don’t stop any medications or treatments without talking to your doctor. 
    • Discuss any concerns about your treatment with your doctor.
    • Keep your regularly scheduled medical appointments. 

      • Talk to your doctor about steps they are taking to reduce risk of exposure to COVID-19 in the office.
      • Use telehealth services whenever possible if recommended by your doctor.
    • Ensure that you are getting necessary tests prescribed by your doctor.
    • Seek urgent medical care if you are feeling unwell.
  • Talk to your doctor, insurer, and pharmacist about getting an emergency supply of prescription medications. Make sure you have at least 30 days of prescription medications, over-the-counter medicines, and supplies on hand in case you need or want to stay home for several weeks. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about ways to receive your medications by mail.
  • Take steps to care for your emotional health. Fear and anxiety about COVID-19 can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions. It is natural to feel concerned or stressed about COVID-19. Learn more about stress and coping with anxiety here. Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.
  • If you are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others: 

Treatment of COVID-19

  • At this time, there is no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment for COVID-19. There is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. Treatment is currently aimed at relieving symptoms, and for hospitalized patients, supporting vital organ function during severe illness.

Additional Information for Specific Conditions & Risk Factors

If you have cancer or have survived cancer

If you have cancer now or had cancer in the past, you might need to take special steps to protect your health:

  • Chemotherapy is an important tool to treat cancer. Although some types of chemotherapy can weaken the immune system, cancer patients and survivors should continue to take their chemotherapy as directed by their doctor.
  • Do not change your cancer treatment plan without discussing it with your doctor.
  • Watch out for fever. Take your temperature any time you feel warm, flushed, chilled, very fatigued, or not well. Call your doctor right away if you have a temperature of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher. 

    • Know the signs and symptoms of infection. Infection during the course of cancer treatment can be very serious. Call your doctor right away if you notice any of the signs and symptoms of an infection.
  • Find out from your doctor when your white blood cell count is likely to the be the lowest, since this is when you’re most at risk for infection. 

    • If you have to go to the emergency room, tell the person checking you in that you are a cancer patient undergoing chemotherapy. Fever during chemotherapy treatment is a medical emergency and you should be seen quickly.
  • Discuss any concerns about your chemotherapy or other cancer treatments with your oncologist and primary healthcare provider.
  • Learn more about Types of Cancer, Risk Factors and Screening for Cancer and Preventing Infections while undergoing treatment for cancer.

If you have had a bone marrow transplant, solid organ transplant, or stem cells for cancer treatment

If you take medications that weaken your immune system, called immunosuppressant medications:

  • Do not change or stop taking medicines without talking to your doctor. Stopping or changing medicine can cause serious health problems.

If you were born with immune deficiencies

Some people are born with or develop immune deficiencies due to genetics. Examples include common variable immune deficiency, selective IgA deficiency, severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and complement deficiencies.

  • If you take medicines to help boost your immune system, do not change or stop them without talking to your doctor.

If you have HIV

The risk of serious illness from COVID-19 for people with HIV is not yet known. If you have HIV and a low CD4 cell count or are not on HIV treatment, you might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

  • Do not change or stop taking medicines without talking to your doctor. Stopping or changing medicine can cause serious health problems.
  • For more details, see CDC’s Information about COVID for people with HIV.

If you are using oral or intravenous corticosteroids or other medicines that lower your immune system’s response

Some medical conditions are treated with medications that can weaken the immune system; these medicines are called immunosuppressants. Common medical conditions that are sometimes treated with immunosuppressants include rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and inflammatory bowel disease.

  • Do not change or stop taking medicines without talking to your doctor. Stopping or changing medicine can cause serious health problems.

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit https://capemaycountynj.gov/ or Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.

People with Moderate to Severe Asthma

This information is based on what we currently know about the spread and severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Risk of Severe Illness from COVID-19

People with moderate to severe asthma may be at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.  COVID-19 can affect your respiratory tract (nose, throat, lungs), cause an asthma attack, and possibly lead to pneumonia and acute respiratory disease.

Treatment

There is currently no specific treatment for or vaccine to prevent COVID-19.  The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

Prepare for COVID-19

  • Stock up on supplies.
  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick.
  • Clean your hands often by washing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid crowds and people who are sick.
  • Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
  • During a COVID-19 outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible to further reduce your risk of being exposed.
  • If someone in your home is sick, have them stay away from the rest of the household to reduce the risk of spreading the virus in your home.
  • Avoid sharing personal household items such as cups and towels.

Follow your Asthma Action Plan

  • Keep your asthma under control by following your asthma action plan.
  • Continue your current medications, including any inhalers with steroids in them (“steroids” is another word for corticosteroids).
  • Don’t stop any medications or change your asthma treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Discuss any concerns about your treatment with your healthcare provider.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider, insurer, and pharmacist about creating an emergency supply of prescription medications, such as asthma inhalers. Make sure that you have 30 days of non-prescription medications and supplies on hand too in case you need to stay home for a long time.
  • Know how to use your inhaler.
  • Avoid your asthma triggers.
  • As more cases of COVID-19 are discovered and our communities take action to combat the spread of disease, it is natural for some people to feel concerned or stressed. 

Clean and disinfect things you or your family touch frequently

  • If possible, have someone who doesn’t have asthma do the cleaning and disinfecting. When they use cleaning and disinfecting products, have them: 
    • Make sure that people with asthma are not in the room.
    • Minimize use of disinfectants that can cause an asthma attack.
    • Open windows or doors and use a fan that blows air outdoors.
    • Clean and disinfect surfaces like phones, remotes, tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks daily.
    • Always follow the instructions on the product label.
    • Spray or pour spray products onto a cleaning cloth or paper towel instead of spraying the product directly onto the cleaning surface (if the product label allows).

If you have symptoms

Contact your health care provider to ask about your symptoms.

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit https://capemaycountynj.gov/ or Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.

Six Feet Saves Successfully Launched in Cape May County

“As Memorial Weekend is underway Cape May County Department of Health wants to stress, we are not out of the woodwork yet. We urge our residents and visitors to continue to take precaution against COVID-19 to protect themselves and others. When outside a mask is not mandatory, but is recommended, if you are unable to keep at least six feet from others,” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer.

Cape May County Department of Health is proud to announce their social distance campaign, Six Feet Saves has successfully launched on May 15, 2020 in Cape May. Since the launch, Cape May County’s Social Distance Ambassadors have been to Wildwood’s Boardwalk and Ocean City’s Boardwalk. Six Feet Saves is an education campaign that will be implemented to remind individuals to keep their distance to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Social Distance Ambassadors will be out in the community thanking individuals who continue taking preventive action against COVID-19, such as social distancing, wearing a cloth mask over their nose, and mouth if they cannot social distance, and washing their hands frequently. They will also be giving out education materials to individuals that are interested. 

Social Distancing Ambassadors will be wearing vests with the county seal on them, so they can be easily identified. The Six Feet Saves Social Distance Ambassador team will be made up of Medical Reserve Corp. members and Cape May County Department of Health staff. Medical Reserve Corp. is a volunteer program comprised of medical and non-medical individuals. To learn more about Medical Reserve Corp. and how you can volunteer you can visit cmchealth.net or call (609) 465-1187. 

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.

Contact Tracing Information and Job Portal

Contact tracing, a core disease control measure employed by local and state health department personnel for decades, is a key strategy for preventing further spread of COVID-19. Contact tracing is part of the process of supporting patients with suspected or confirmed infection.

In contact tracing, public health staff work with a patient to help them recall everyone with whom they have had close contact during the timeframe while they may have been infectious. Public health staff then warn these exposed individuals (contacts) of their potential exposure as rapidly and sensitively as possible.

Contacts are provided with education, information, and support to understand their risk, what they should do to separate themselves from others who are not exposed, monitor themselves for illness, and the possibility that they could spread the infection to others even if they themselves do not feel ill.

Contacts are encouraged to stay home and maintain social distance from others (at least 6 feet) until 14 days after their last exposure, in case they also become ill. They should monitor themselves by checking their temperature twice daily and watching for cough or shortness of breath. To the extent possible, public health staff should check in with contacts to make sure they are self-monitoring and have not developed symptoms. Contacts who develop symptoms should promptly isolate themselves and notify public health staff. They should be promptly evaluated for infection and for the need for medical care.

Recently, Governor Murphy highlighted the state’s effort to build a contact-tracing corps that will supplement the roughly 800 staff and volunteers now doing this work on a local and county level. The governor said the state would tap public health students at Rutgers University and other colleges for assistance, plus contract with a staffing company to hire additional tracers. 

Murphy said contact tracers will be paid $25 an hour, and will either be employed by the state, Rutgers or the contractor, officials said. (Interested individuals can also sign up online.)

https://covid19.nj.gov/forms/tracer

The state will foot the bill for a new technology platform to provide training and data-collection functions for all contact tracers, regardless of where they are deployed, officials said. Their findings will be compiled in a central state database, although the privacy of those who test positive will be protected, according to DOH.

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit https://capemaycountynj.gov/ or Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.


Social Distance Ambassadors are Coming to your Community 

5/12/20- Cape May County Department of Health is proud to announce their social distance campaign, Six Feet Saves. Six Feet Saves is an educational campaign that will be implemented to remind individuals to keep their distance to help slow the spread of COVID-19. Social Distance Ambassadors will be monitoring high volume areas, such as boardwalks, to remind individuals to keep their six feet, and to give educational materials on how to prevent being exposed.

“As public places begin to reopen it is important to continue to take proper precautions, such as wearing a mask, washing hands frequently, and social distancing. Cape May County Department of Health wants to remind residents and visitors to continue taking action to slow the spread of COVID-19. By protecting yourself and others you can help save lives,” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer.

Cape May County Department of Health’s education campaign Six Feet Saves, will launch on May 15, 2020 in Cape May. The campaign will be comprised of Social Distance Ambassadors who will remind individuals to keep their six feet and give out educational materials on how to prevent being exposed to COVID-19. Social Distancing Ambassadors will be wearing vests with the county seal on them so they can be easily identified.

Six Feet Saves Lives Social Distance Ambassador team will be made up of Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) members and Cape May County Department of Health staff. MRC is a volunteer program made up of medical and non-medical individuals. To learn more about MRC and how you can volunteer visit cmchealth.net or call (609) 463-6692. Visit the following link to volunteer to be for the Social Distance Ambassador.

For additional information on what Cape May County is doing to slow the spread of COVID-19 visit www.cmchealth.net. You can also like Cape May County Department of Health on Facebook or call (609) 463-1187.


As Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases Continue to Increase Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Recommends Wearing a Cloth Face Covering in Public Settings

4/18/20- “The number one prevention method against COVID-19 remains social distancing. Individuals should only leave their homes for essential travel. When essential travel is necessary to a public place that social distancing is difficult the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, recommends the use of a cloth face covering to slow the spread of COVID-19.” said Kevin Thomas, Cape May County Health Officer. 

CDC is recommending the use of cloth face masks to help individuals who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others. The cloth mask should be used in public settings where social distancing can be difficult, for example grocery stores and pharmacies. Cloth face coverings can be made from common household items at low cost. The cloth face covering that are being recommended by the CDC are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators, these supplies should be reserved for healthcare works and other medical first responders. 

Cloth Face Coverings Should: 

  • Fit snugly but comfortably against the side of the face.
  • Be secured with ties or ear loops.
  • Include multiple layers of fabric.
  • Allow for breathing without restriction.
  • Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance. Cloth face coverings should be routinely washed depending on the frequency of use. The face covering can be simple washed in the washing machine. When removing the cloth face covering it is important not to touch one’s eyes, nose, and mouth until they have washed their hands. 

Call your healthcare professional if you have concerns about COVID-19 and your underlying health conditions. Stay up to date on the current situation as it evolves. Some reliable sources are New Jersey Poison Information and Education System hotline at 211 or 1-800-962-1253, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov, the World Health Organization at www.who.int, the New Jersey Department of Health at COVID19.nj.gov. For additional information visit Cape May County Department of Health at www.cmchealth.net, also like us on Facebook.